Motorola, Google’s Blind Spot

Was Motorola a big blunder for Google? Two years ago Google acquired Motorola for $12.5 billion, and has just announced an agreement to sell Motorola to Lenovo for $2.91 billion. The original acquisition of Motorola has proved to be a heavy financial loss for Google, but a steal on Lenovo’s part.

What was Google thinking? The company originally expressed interest in Motorola because they wanted the security of Motorola patents in order to stand up to Apple and Microsoft in court cases. In Microsoft v. Motorola, the original lawsuit was valued at $4 billion, but ultimately the case closed with Microsoft paying $1.7 million annually. At that rate it would take 3,235 years for the lawsuit to reach the original predicted valuation. Additionally, Motorola’s sales began to drop drastically over the two years.

Whole Foods: Salaries Exposed

MSN Money reports Whole Foods has been exposing its employees’ salaries since 1986, when co-CEO John Mackey introduced the open policy. Once a month, Whole Foods collects financial data from each of the chain’s locations. Leaders in this industry believe it is important for its employees to see how much money others in the company are making, to motivate them on what it takes to reach a certain dollar amount. There have been some disputes within the company about certain parties making more money, but Mackey explains how people are paid based on their performance and level of value. He believes this approach creates a high trust organization and causes employees to become increasingly invested in the company.

Jack Ma: “Stop Complaining, You Can Find Opportunities”

  Jack Ma is the founder of the world-renowned global wholesale trade online platform called Alibaba. In this video, Jack clearly identifies the simple observation that many people in life overlook, because they are too busy complaining and in their own silos: That the majority of people in life are unwilling to change and always

Book Review: One Minute Manager

One Minute Manager

Ken Blanchard and Spencer Johnson

Key Concepts:

Emphasis on efficiency: by being more organized efficiency is increased.

Emphasizes that everyone makes their own decisions (more accountability).

Participative management is bad—let others make their own decisions and efficiency is increased.  Managers that participate in the decision-making of their employees try to control the situation more often then not and are less efficient.

“A One Minute Manager—someone who gets good results without taking much time” (Blanchard and Johnson, p. 22).